Archive | September, 2010

Etsy Store is open!

I stocked the Etsy store with several colors of the Arabian Mare bookmark today, and was tickled to find someone had put the slate blue one (to the far left) in a “Treasury” listing. Those are groupings of items users pick out from the site, usually following a theme, to display on the front page of the site. Unfortunately I haven’t yet figured out how to link those directly to the blog, but it was neat to see it there.

I’m still in the process of listing some of the pendants and tiles. I thought it would be a good idea to get them up in time for folks that do their holiday shopping early!

I’ve also in the process of updating the website with pages for the giftware. There has actually been a fair bit of it made here over the years, but a lot of it has never been seen since I tend to make it for my own gift-giving! I’ve also started formalizing my glaze colors and giving them names. I’ve had people ask me to glaze something to match an earlier piece and realized that unless I named the color formulas, we’d all have a hard time knowing which blue or which green was wanted. After laughing at the exotic names people sometimes give to product colors, I now have a new appreciation for how difficult it is to come up with a name that gives the buyer a good idea of the tone without sounding too generic and bland or too over-the-top and silly.



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Off with her head! (again)

I never imagined, when I began molding horses here at the pottery, that I’d be decapitating so many of my ponies. I had hopes early on that Elsie would cast bob-tailed but otherwise whole, but there was just too much of a turn so off went the head.

The one I’m holding in the picture isn’t the real Elsie master head; since I had a poor casting I had the luxury of making a test cut. I wanted to see how it would set in the rest of the mold and how I would create the two separate molds – one for the head and one for the body – from the pieces. I think this extra needs to go live with my friend Jackie Arns, to keep the infamous Beowulf company. Jackie won’t mind that Emma, the ever-shedding studio dog, left a little bit of herself in the rubber.

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